My Favourite Window

September 5, 2012

For the Future


I cannot quite believe that I have planted a tree in my garden. 
I have planted many trees in the past and even before I became a professional gardener, I planted them here with my father. But since Elwin and I bought this land two years ago, I have planted nothing for the Future.  Dealing with the Present took all of my energy.
But now, the sap is rising and a tree raised from seed is overdue for transplanting from its tub. Ten years ago I sowed the seed of five haws from a young pink may in the garden. First I crushed the fruit and mixed the pulp with gritty sand before putting it inside a plastic bag at the back of the fridge. In the spring I potted the mess into a sand and fine bark mix and left it in a cool, shaded place. The following spring - 2003 - the seed germinated and from it I have raised three trees. This one is the most vigorous specimen and flowered years ahead of the other two: frothy double white blooms on arching stems. 


Last year's double white may in front of parent Crataegus laevigata 'Rosea Flore Plena'

I have enjoyed the three trees in their tubs outside the kitchen window, not just for their blossom, but because the secretive garden birds visit them, not knowing that I am watching from very close quarters. While Andy was here a couple of weeks ago, he began the unwieldy business of shifting this tree. 



Continued rain and boggy ground hindered progress, but I finished the job last week. Wrenching the tree from its old laundry tub was time consuming and difficult. Roots had grown through the plug hole, but even the fine ones had to be teased free. Once I had released the roots, the root ball was not as big as it should have been for a healthy transplant.


Hopefully the high ground water will encourage new root growth.



I dug a round hole three times the width of the anticipated root ball, and as deep as I could go (the topsoil here is two spade spits deep). I kept the turfs separate for placing upside down at the bottom of the hole. As they decay they will provide nutrients for the young tree. I raised the base of the hole so that the tree would sit with its old planting level just below ground level. Then I mixed the clayey subsoil with loose topsoil and filled in the rest of the hole. Although conventional wisdom implores the home gardener not to bring the subsoil to the surface, here I have noticed how it provides a moisture retentive medium during summer drought.



And this is as far as I got before I had to begin the after-school drama run.


Pink may, double pink hawthorn,  Crataegus laevigata 'Rosea Flore Pleno.'
Midland may, double white hawthorn  Crataegus laevigata 'Plena'

And who won the 'Latitude' magazine from my second anniversary post ? I didn't quite get the cascade of writerly prose that I was hoping for but Cindy from Just North of Wiarton and South of the Checkerboard is the winner!

18 comments:

Cindy@NorthofWiarton said...

I do envy your garden knowledge and green thumb. Drama School Run? do you drive a School Bus?

Cindy@NorthofWiarton said...

and I had just noticed I had "won" the magazine on your giveaway? Thank you.

rusty duck said...

The tree looks magnificent.

I kept a few young trees in pots for three years whilst we were renting, waiting to move into our next (now current) permanent home. A couple of acers, two Cornus kousa and a Davidia.

They too were growing out of the bottom of the pot, and I think I only just got to them in time. But a few months later you can really see the difference. They all seem to have grown by at least a third of their original size.

I hope you enjoy watching yours blossom out over the Spring.

Susan Heather said...

Both the double white and that wonderful pink look great - I am sure it will be happy in its new spot.

I had a bay tree in a pot for more years than I care to remember and planted it out in our new garden a couple of years ago. It has thrived ever since and I am a "stick it in the ground and hope gardener" not a professional like you.

Jeneane said...

Cindy: Some of my garden knowledge is the book learning kind but quite a lot of it is the Life experience kind. The drama run is just a mother running around getting kids to different after-school activities. If you are interested you could see what my girls get up to by typing 'Winter Wonderland' and 'Seeing Red' into the Search panel in my sidebar.
Congratulations on your win. I've sent you an email for address details.

Jeneane said...

rusty duck: Aha, a fellow connoisseur. There is a Davidia languishing in my nursery - a memorial gift for my husband (to do with handkerchieves and Morris dancing). Your reassuring comment has got me all inspired. After all, I have a big empty tub to fill now...

Jeneane said...

Susan Heather: Flowering time is approaching again. I look forward to the wild hawthorn flowering around here too, even though it is a noxious weed. More experience of a long-potted tree recovering well. Thanks for that. And have you stuck some hazelnuts in the ground with a good dose of Hope?

Cro Magnon said...

And may I remind folk that the expression 'Ne'er cast a clout till May is out' refers to May flower, and NOT to the month of May, that so many imagine. For you 'down under' it makes much more sense as well.

I have a white flowered May, but that pink is fabulous.

libby said...

How wonderful to have the skill and knowledge you have LM...and then to watch as trees/shrubs/flowers live and grow.

Jeneane said...

Cro Magnon: Good reminder there Cro.
The weather is so mild now that it is very tempting to cast aside a clout or two. Here - and possibly for you too - I would say also: don't plant tomato plants till may is out. End of October, beginning of November here.

Jeneane said...

libby: An illusion I'm sure, and you with your bounty of potatoes!

Cindy@NorthofWiarton said...

Hello Jeanne, I have received no email as of yet at justnorthofwiarton@gmail.com I also very much your other 2 posts you had pointed out for me. Thank you.

Owen said...

May it grow tall and prosper !

Jeneane said...

Owen: Thank you for your good wishes.
They are all part of the growing magic :-)

the cuby poet said...

Part 1 of the trees' transplanting is so full of really fascinating bits peppered with your knowledge and enthusiasm. May these trees be happy and show their appreciation of your care by flowering profusely in Spring.

MrsC said...

Hello Jeneane, I had to come and have a look at your blog too, so I will recognise you when you come in to see me and my shop! :) Ashley and Loburn area very dear to my heart, a very dear friend lives there (we used to be Cantabrians but left in 2008) See you soon! xo

Jeneane said...

the cuby poet: you air an expectation of a continuing story! I shall try to oblige.

Jeneane said...

Mrs C: Welcome to Lady Mondegreen's Secret Garden. By the sound of your pedigree you have probably driven by some time in the past! It sounds like your production of Lords and Ladies was not the Wellington one I was thinking of.